HOME
ARCHIEVES
CALL FOR PAPERS     SUBMISSION LAST DATE      28th October, 2020 FOR NOVEMBER ISSUE     

November,2017 Issue

Abstract:

Christian Religious Education (CRE) in Kenya dates back to the 18th century with coming of the European missionaries (Kenya Institute of Education, KIE, 1989).Hence, CRE has been a teaching subject since the coming of the missionaries in Kenya. At the beginning, it was taught for purpose of conversation but it gained a new orientation after independence of an academic subject. The purpose of teaching CRE in independent Kenya was to foster national goals such as national unity and fostering respect for self and others, and their property. However, the introduction of 8-4-4 system of education in Kenya in 1985 placed a premium on science and technical subjects which could be directly be used for employment. Consequently, CRE became an elective. However, there have been increased cases of destruction of school property, cheating in exams and drug abuse among others among the other students. This could be an indicator of loss of key moral values such as self respect and respect of others that CRE is expected to foster. The study investigated the attitude of students towards the teaching of CRE shaping moral values. Ex-posto research design was adapted. The study was carried out among form four students in to randomly selected secondary schools in Nakuru County. The sample size comprised of 307 form four CRE students. A student attitude questionnaire (SAQ) containing both open and closed items was used for data collection. Data was analysed using statistical package for social science (SPSS). Descriptive and inferential statistics were used. Test of significance were performed at α= 0.05. The results indicated that the study of CRE is important and relevant in the world today due to its contribution to moral development and provision of career opportunities. However the wide nature of the syllabus, peer pressure, lack of adult role models and human weakness. The results could be useful to policy makers in the ministry of education, curriculum developers at the KICD, CRE teachers and school counselors.


Abstract:

Hundreds of medicines, including life-threating and chronic diseases medicines, have raised incredibly making them out of the reach of patients in Libya. This happen after pharmaceutical companies increased prices more than 100 per cent during the past few months. Many of these medicines are prescribed broadly for the treatment of common illnesses such as fever, pain, flu, diarrhea, infection, and other diseases. The government is yet to respond to the repeated alarm raised the insistent acute shortage of medicines, some of which are emergency medicines, prevailing across the country for the past few months. This issue has been heading from bad to worse since the ignorance of regulatory authority of Libya to take positive actions is evident.


Abstract:

UNESCO report of 2013/2014 indicates that 57 million school girls’ children were out of school globally of which 55 percent were girls. According to the report Kenya is among the Countries in the World with the highest number of children out of primary school. This paper analyses the impact of parental level of literacy on education of girls in primary schools in Kajiado County of Kenya, by making detailed review of the available literature the past review on the primary school dropout phenomenon have been carried out without proper analysis of illiteracy as a factor that contribute to girls dropout in primary school girls among the Maasai. This paper indicates that parental illiteracy occasioned dropout rate for girls. The conceptual framework provided in this study illustrates how parental illiteracy affect girls educational outcome which consequently lead to dropout. The study recommend that the government should develop appropriate policies to enhance adult education especially women in order to promote girls education in primary schools.


Abstract:

Adolescence is understood as a difficult developmental period in one’s life. Many highly concentrated demands are made upon youth by society during this period for independence, for peer and heterosexual adjustments, for educational and vocational preparation and for the development of a workable set of personal and social values. Adolescents exhibit a strong peer group need. It is time when the developing individual is extremely anxious about his relationship with his age mates (Mehta, 2000).  Parents play a critical role in shaping the behavior and personality of the adolescents and based on their characteristics adolescents interact with their peers. Within this theoretical frame work, this doctoral research was undertaken to study the effects of parenting styles on dimensions of friendship in school going adolescents in Jaipur City, India.
The sample comprised of 240 subjects in the age group of 12-18 years, representing early, middle and late adolescence. Equal numbers of girls and boys were included in the sample. Basic Profile Inventory, Transactional Styles Inventory-Parent Feedback and Dimensions of Friendship tests were used to obtain data. Adolescents were asked to give a feedback on how they perceive the parenting styles of parents.
The results revealed that on the style of ‘nurturing’ larger majority of adolescents (30.83%) perceived their parents in “high” and “very high” categories, while on the styles on ‘creative’, ‘regulating’, ‘confronting’, ‘task-management’, and ‘adaptive’, adolescents scored their parenting styles in “low” and “average” categories on the scale. Children perceived their parents as highly nuturant but low on other styles. On ‘task-management’ and ‘adaptive’ styles, there were highly significant differences reported in the genders. Girls found their parents higher on the above two parenting styles as compared to the boys.
The results revealed that on the style of ‘nurturing’ larger majority of adolescents (30.83%) perceived their parents in “high” and “very high” categories, while on the styles on ‘creative’, ‘regulating’, ‘confronting’, ‘task-management’, and ‘adaptive’, adolescents scored their parenting styles in “low” and “average” categories on the scale. Children perceived their parents as highly nuturant but low on other styles. On ‘task-management’ and ‘adaptive’ styles, there were highly significant differences reported in the genders. Girls found their parents higher on the above two parenting styles as compared to the boys.
Results on the dimensions on friendship revealed that on the dimensions on ‘enjoyment’, ‘acceptance’, ‘respect’, ‘mutual assistance’, and ‘spontaneity’, larger majority of adolescents scored in ‘high’ and ‘neutral’ categories, while on the dimensions on ‘trust’, ‘confiding’ and ‘understanding’, adolescents fell in the ‘neutral’ and ‘high’ categories on the scale. It can be concluded that, on most of the dimensions of friendship, adolescents fell in ‘high’ category. No subject scored in the ‘lower’ category of the scale. ‘t’ values suggested that the girls were significantly higher on the dimensions on ‘enjoyment’, ‘trust’, and ‘understanding’ as compared to boys in the total sample on Dimensions of Friendship Scale.
Significant correlationships were observed between parenting styles and the dimensions of friendship in school going adolescents.


Abstract:

This paper highlights the challenges of the implementation of the Christian religious education in Kenyan schools in the 21st century. Christian religious education is one of the earliest subjects in Kenya’s school curriculum. The aims of Christian religious education are to enable students acquire knowledge and other dispositions which help them fit well in society. Inspite of this, the teaching of the subject is still faced with challenges in its implementation. These include inadequate facilities, global social changes and students’ attitude among others.  The paper posits that in view of the important attached to the subject in the school curriculum, there is need to address these challenges so as to achieve the positive goals.  The paper concludes by making useful suggestions on the way forward.


Abstract:

Kohlberg theory of moral development explains the stages of moral development with connection to the growth of an individual. The theory stipulates that as a child grows in age, the ability to reason morally should also increase. Moral reasoning is important it enables students to distinguish between right and wrong. Kenyan secondary schools moral reasoning is taught through Christian Religious Education (CRE). Despite exposure to moral reasoning content, moral judgement of students is generally unsatisfactory. This is reflected in immoral behaviour such as drug abuse and destruction of school property among others. This suggests that moral education imparted through the carrier subjects has not achieved its objectives. This study investigated the influence of Christian Religious Education Curriculum on secondary school students’ moral reasoning. The study adopted the descriptive survey research design. A sample of 386 students was selected using stratified, proportionate and simple random sampling techniques. CRE Students’ Moral Reasoning Test (CRESMRAT) was used to collect data. Qualitative data was summarised and described using frequencies, percentages, means and standard deviations. The results of the study indicated that moral reasoning content coverage in the CRE curriculum and students moral reasoning level were average. The results of the study can be used by Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD) to enhance moral reasoning content of the CRE curriculum while teacher training institutions can use them to strengthen moral education and methodologies in their programmes. The results can also be used by teachers to enhance moral education content delivery. Lastly, the results can be used by the society to mould young people into responsible citizens.


Abstract:

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) which have an economic backwardness, fragile ecosystem and social fabrics were mainly built on multicultural pillars. The features of SIDS make social inclusion more important than ever in order to survive in the global change. Mauritius, one of the small islands is still accommodating its multicultural society. A system of education for a sustainable society has a pivotal role to play to support a cohesive society. Fostering social inclusion in SIDS will enable such society to be more cohesive and thus be equipped with the necessary inclusive mechanisms for managing conflicts. In order to promote respect for and acceptance of diversity in today`s societies, Intercultural Education is proposed as a powerful mechanism to strengthen social cohesion. In section one, the vulnerabilities of SIDS will be highlighted. In section two, the link between social cohesion and Intercultural Education will be exploited. Section 3 will be focusing on the Intercultural Education Project which was undertaken by the Mauritius Institute of Education (M.I.E). The methodology for this article will be based on an analysis of policy documents, reports and interviews.